May. 30th, 2009

webfarmer: (Default)
This is the saddest part of how this new nuclear saga may play out in countries that REALLY can't afford the "advance" of nuclear power. Nuclear France, Inc. must be providing some serious sweeteners on this deal given the turn around in policy.

Eskom to Bankrupt SA [South Africa]? - iAfrica.com - 27 May 09

"By pushing ahead with its nuclear plans, South African power utility Eskom will bankrupt this country, environmental lobbyists Earthlife Africa said on Wednesday. Accusing Eskom of an 'uneconomic U-turn' on its nuclear plans, Earthlife Africa questioned the utility's ability to fund its R1.3-trillion capital expenditure programme."

""In just over six months, Eskom has changed its mind on nuclear power. In December 2008, Eskom considered nuclear power to be too expensive. In May 2009, Eskom released plans to build [4000MW of]nuclear plants," said Earthlife Africa energy policy officer Tristen Taylor."

"Three nuclear plants, each with a generation capacity of 4000MW, would be brought into operation every two years starting July 2018 through to July 2022. Eskom currently operates Africa's sole nuclear power plant with a total capacity of 1800 MW. "


Press Release: Eskom's Uneconomic Nuclear U-Turn - Earthlife Africa Jhb - 27 May 09

"Press Release: Eskom’s Uneconomic Nuclear U-turn
Earthlife Africa Jhb
27th of May 2009

In just over six months, Eskom has changed its mind on nuclear power. In December 2008, Eskom considered nuclear power to be too expensive. In May 2009, Eskom released plans to build nuclear plants. What changed?

From the financial point of view…nothing. Nuclear power remains the most expensive form of electricity generation, comes with inherent safety risks, and produces highly radioactive waste that must be dealt with for hundreds, if not thousands, of generations. The costs of generating electricity from nuclear power exceed that of coal, natural gas, geothermal, wind, solar thermal, and landfill gas.

Where Eskom hopes to find the money for this expensive project is beyond comprehension. Currently, Eskom does not have a funding model to support its current CAPEX programme of R340 billion. Eskom’s recent application to NERSA is about seeking a 34% tariff increase to meet rising primary energy and maintenance costs; covering the R1.3 trillion CAPEX programme is not included in current electricity tariffs.

Recent reports suggest that Eskom will be seeking funding from the Government for its nuclear programme. Ordinary citizens will have to pay for an industry that produces radioactive waste, creates fewer jobs than any other form of electricity generation, and is the most expensive form of electricity generation.

By pushing ahead its nuclear plans, Eskom will bankrupt this country.

Key Facts on Nuclear Power:

* Estimated Capital Cost of New Nuclear Power Plant: R1.82/kWh [1]
* Estimated Total Cost per kWh for New Nuclear Power Plant: R2.46/kWh [2]
* Current Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs (which include profit for companies and capital costs) as Approved by NERSA:
** Wind: R1.25/kWh
** Landfill Gas: R0.90/kWh
** Small Hydro: R0.94/kWh
** Concentrated Solar: R2.10/kWh

For more information, please contact:

Tristen Taylor
Energy Policy Officer
Earthlife Africa-Johannesburg Branch
Tel: +27 11 339 3662
Fax: +27 11 339 3270
Cell: +27 84 250 2434
www.earthlife.org.za

[1] This assumes no cost overruns. However, cost overruns of nuclear power are legendary. Areva, who built Koeburg and is bidding to build additional reactors in the Cape, is trying to build a new pressurised reactor in Finland. In Nov. 2008, Areva announced that costs for that reactor have soared from €3 billion to €4.5 billion and the finish date has been pushed back from 2009 to 2011. The recurring trend within the industry in considerable cost overruns; in the USA, 75 reactors had combined initial construction budgets of US$45 billion, actual construction costs ran to US$145 billion. In India, the last ten reactors built averaged construction cost of 300% above budgeted costs.

[2] Please see “Business Risks and Costs of New Nuclear Power”, pg. 31, http://climateprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/nuclear-costs-2009.pdf
webfarmer: (Default)
This is the saddest part of how this new nuclear saga may play out in countries that REALLY can't afford the "advance" of nuclear power. Nuclear France, Inc. must be providing some serious sweeteners on this deal given the turn around in policy.

Eskom to Bankrupt SA [South Africa]? - iAfrica.com - 27 May 09

"By pushing ahead with its nuclear plans, South African power utility Eskom will bankrupt this country, environmental lobbyists Earthlife Africa said on Wednesday. Accusing Eskom of an 'uneconomic U-turn' on its nuclear plans, Earthlife Africa questioned the utility's ability to fund its R1.3-trillion capital expenditure programme."

""In just over six months, Eskom has changed its mind on nuclear power. In December 2008, Eskom considered nuclear power to be too expensive. In May 2009, Eskom released plans to build [4000MW of]nuclear plants," said Earthlife Africa energy policy officer Tristen Taylor."

"Three nuclear plants, each with a generation capacity of 4000MW, would be brought into operation every two years starting July 2018 through to July 2022. Eskom currently operates Africa's sole nuclear power plant with a total capacity of 1800 MW. "


Press Release: Eskom's Uneconomic Nuclear U-Turn - Earthlife Africa Jhb - 27 May 09

"Press Release: Eskom’s Uneconomic Nuclear U-turn
Earthlife Africa Jhb
27th of May 2009

In just over six months, Eskom has changed its mind on nuclear power. In December 2008, Eskom considered nuclear power to be too expensive. In May 2009, Eskom released plans to build nuclear plants. What changed?

From the financial point of view…nothing. Nuclear power remains the most expensive form of electricity generation, comes with inherent safety risks, and produces highly radioactive waste that must be dealt with for hundreds, if not thousands, of generations. The costs of generating electricity from nuclear power exceed that of coal, natural gas, geothermal, wind, solar thermal, and landfill gas.

Where Eskom hopes to find the money for this expensive project is beyond comprehension. Currently, Eskom does not have a funding model to support its current CAPEX programme of R340 billion. Eskom’s recent application to NERSA is about seeking a 34% tariff increase to meet rising primary energy and maintenance costs; covering the R1.3 trillion CAPEX programme is not included in current electricity tariffs.

Recent reports suggest that Eskom will be seeking funding from the Government for its nuclear programme. Ordinary citizens will have to pay for an industry that produces radioactive waste, creates fewer jobs than any other form of electricity generation, and is the most expensive form of electricity generation.

By pushing ahead its nuclear plans, Eskom will bankrupt this country.

Key Facts on Nuclear Power:

* Estimated Capital Cost of New Nuclear Power Plant: R1.82/kWh [1]
* Estimated Total Cost per kWh for New Nuclear Power Plant: R2.46/kWh [2]
* Current Renewable Energy Feed-in Tariffs (which include profit for companies and capital costs) as Approved by NERSA:
** Wind: R1.25/kWh
** Landfill Gas: R0.90/kWh
** Small Hydro: R0.94/kWh
** Concentrated Solar: R2.10/kWh

For more information, please contact:

Tristen Taylor
Energy Policy Officer
Earthlife Africa-Johannesburg Branch
Tel: +27 11 339 3662
Fax: +27 11 339 3270
Cell: +27 84 250 2434
www.earthlife.org.za

[1] This assumes no cost overruns. However, cost overruns of nuclear power are legendary. Areva, who built Koeburg and is bidding to build additional reactors in the Cape, is trying to build a new pressurised reactor in Finland. In Nov. 2008, Areva announced that costs for that reactor have soared from €3 billion to €4.5 billion and the finish date has been pushed back from 2009 to 2011. The recurring trend within the industry in considerable cost overruns; in the USA, 75 reactors had combined initial construction budgets of US$45 billion, actual construction costs ran to US$145 billion. In India, the last ten reactors built averaged construction cost of 300% above budgeted costs.

[2] Please see “Business Risks and Costs of New Nuclear Power”, pg. 31, http://climateprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/nuclear-costs-2009.pdf

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