May. 27th, 2009

webfarmer: (Default)
Love it when things work out right for the good guys.

Petraeus Endorses Obama's Plans to Close GITMO, End Torture - Huffington Post - 26 May 09

"'I think, on balance, that those moves help [us],' said the chief of U.S. Central Command. 'In fact, I have long been on record as having testified and also in helping write doctrine for interrogation techniques that are completely in line with the Geneva Convention. And as a division commander in Iraq in the early days, we put out guidance very early on to make sure that our soldiers, in fact, knew that we needed to stay within those guidelines.

'With respect to Guantanamo,' Petraeus added, 'I think that the closure in a responsible manner, obviously one that is certainly being worked out now by the Department of Justice -- I talked to the Attorney General the other day [and] they have a very intensive effort ongoing to determine, indeed, what to do with the detainees who are left, how to deal with them in a legal way, and if continued incarceration is necessary -- again, how to take that forward. But doing that in a responsible manner, I think, sends an important message to the world, as does the commitment of the United States to observe the Geneva Convention when it comes to the treatment of detainees.'"
webfarmer: (Default)
Love it when things work out right for the good guys.

Petraeus Endorses Obama's Plans to Close GITMO, End Torture - Huffington Post - 26 May 09

"'I think, on balance, that those moves help [us],' said the chief of U.S. Central Command. 'In fact, I have long been on record as having testified and also in helping write doctrine for interrogation techniques that are completely in line with the Geneva Convention. And as a division commander in Iraq in the early days, we put out guidance very early on to make sure that our soldiers, in fact, knew that we needed to stay within those guidelines.

'With respect to Guantanamo,' Petraeus added, 'I think that the closure in a responsible manner, obviously one that is certainly being worked out now by the Department of Justice -- I talked to the Attorney General the other day [and] they have a very intensive effort ongoing to determine, indeed, what to do with the detainees who are left, how to deal with them in a legal way, and if continued incarceration is necessary -- again, how to take that forward. But doing that in a responsible manner, I think, sends an important message to the world, as does the commitment of the United States to observe the Geneva Convention when it comes to the treatment of detainees.'"
webfarmer: (Default)
This is a fun one.

Nuclear: Atomic Power Has Favorable Reaction - Financial Times - 26 May 09

"A western energy executive who has been studying China’s nuclear programme tells a story about looking at pictures of the site being cleared for construction. 'Before, there was a mountain there. Then they bring the army in and a few months later the mountain has gone, and they have the space to build six reactors.'

He tells the story with a slightly wistful air. If only – he must be thinking – building reactors in the west were that easy.
"

"Stephen Thomas, professor of energy studies at the University of Greenwich, argues: 'The two main French entities in nuclear power – Areva and EDF – originally were, and remain today, largely branches of the French government. They are directed as a matter of state policy and have benefited from extremely favourable government financing and credit assurances.

'To duplicate this experience in the US, you would essentially have to nationalise your electric utilities and have all new power plant siting decisions emanate from the White House.'


Although issues of safety, nuclear proliferation and waste disposal often dominate the political debate about nuclear power, the central issue for companies thinking of investing in nuclear power is simply cost. New nuclear plants are hugely expensive. EDF estimates about €4bn-€5bn ($5bn-$7bn) for one of its 1,600 megawatt reactors."


Consider that this single reactor cost is a huge portion of the book value of even the larger utilities. Duke Energy, for example, is just north of $20 billion. How big of a bet do taxpayers and ratepayers really want to place on this unproven new technology? Recall, no prototypes are being built, they are jumping straight to full and enormous scale.

It's clear that Wall Street still finds it radioactive. Thus the continuing industry calls for federal loan guarantees by the billions and state approvals of "pre-paid", by the ratepayer, nuclear plant financing.
webfarmer: (Default)
This is a fun one.

Nuclear: Atomic Power Has Favorable Reaction - Financial Times - 26 May 09

"A western energy executive who has been studying China’s nuclear programme tells a story about looking at pictures of the site being cleared for construction. 'Before, there was a mountain there. Then they bring the army in and a few months later the mountain has gone, and they have the space to build six reactors.'

He tells the story with a slightly wistful air. If only – he must be thinking – building reactors in the west were that easy.
"

"Stephen Thomas, professor of energy studies at the University of Greenwich, argues: 'The two main French entities in nuclear power – Areva and EDF – originally were, and remain today, largely branches of the French government. They are directed as a matter of state policy and have benefited from extremely favourable government financing and credit assurances.

'To duplicate this experience in the US, you would essentially have to nationalise your electric utilities and have all new power plant siting decisions emanate from the White House.'


Although issues of safety, nuclear proliferation and waste disposal often dominate the political debate about nuclear power, the central issue for companies thinking of investing in nuclear power is simply cost. New nuclear plants are hugely expensive. EDF estimates about €4bn-€5bn ($5bn-$7bn) for one of its 1,600 megawatt reactors."


Consider that this single reactor cost is a huge portion of the book value of even the larger utilities. Duke Energy, for example, is just north of $20 billion. How big of a bet do taxpayers and ratepayers really want to place on this unproven new technology? Recall, no prototypes are being built, they are jumping straight to full and enormous scale.

It's clear that Wall Street still finds it radioactive. Thus the continuing industry calls for federal loan guarantees by the billions and state approvals of "pre-paid", by the ratepayer, nuclear plant financing.

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