May. 8th, 2009

webfarmer: (Default)
There's a whole lot less fooling around with this approach. Grow switchgrass or corn stover, burn it in a boiler, make electricity charge your batteries and go.

Bioelectricity Promises More 'Miles Per Acre" Than Ethanol - Science Daily - 08 May 09

"Researchers writing in the online edition of the journal Science on May 7 say the best bet is to convert the biomass to electricity, rather than ethanol. They calculate that, compared to ethanol used for internal combustion engines, bioelectricity used for battery-powered vehicles would deliver an average of 80% more miles of transportation per acre of crops, while also providing double the greenhouse gas offsets to mitigate climate change.

'It's a relatively obvious question once you ask it, but nobody had really asked it before,' says study co-author Chris Field, director of the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution. 'The kinds of motivations that have driven people to think about developing ethanol as a vehicle fuel have been somewhat different from those that have been motivating people to think about battery electric vehicles, but the overlap is in the area of maximizing efficiency and minimizing adverse impacts on climate.'"
webfarmer: (Default)
There's a whole lot less fooling around with this approach. Grow switchgrass or corn stover, burn it in a boiler, make electricity charge your batteries and go.

Bioelectricity Promises More 'Miles Per Acre" Than Ethanol - Science Daily - 08 May 09

"Researchers writing in the online edition of the journal Science on May 7 say the best bet is to convert the biomass to electricity, rather than ethanol. They calculate that, compared to ethanol used for internal combustion engines, bioelectricity used for battery-powered vehicles would deliver an average of 80% more miles of transportation per acre of crops, while also providing double the greenhouse gas offsets to mitigate climate change.

'It's a relatively obvious question once you ask it, but nobody had really asked it before,' says study co-author Chris Field, director of the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution. 'The kinds of motivations that have driven people to think about developing ethanol as a vehicle fuel have been somewhat different from those that have been motivating people to think about battery electric vehicles, but the overlap is in the area of maximizing efficiency and minimizing adverse impacts on climate.'"
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Safe, inexpensive and reliable nuclear power at work. Hopefully it won't catch fire again anytime soon.

Tokyo Electric Quake-Hit Reactor Safe, Governor Says - Bloomberg - 07 May 09

"All seven reactors at the Kashiwazaki Kariwa plant were shut after the 6.8-magnitude earthquake in July 2007 shook it more than assumed possible in its design, triggering a fire and radiation leaks.

Asia’s biggest utility posted its second annual loss on April 30 because of costs related to the shutdown. Japan’s central government and two local mayors have already said the reactor is safe to restart, and assent by Niigata prefecture is the final approval needed. On April 10 Izumida postponed a decision on the reactor’s safety. The following day a fire broke out at the facility, the ninth since the shutdown."

"The latest fire stoked mistrust among local residents, who were concerned about the plant even before the earthquake. In 2002 Tokyo Electric revealed it had fabricated safety reports as far back as the 1980s, and the chairman and president resigned. In February 2007, five months before the earthquake, then- president Tsunehisa Katsumata said the company had found hundreds more incidents of faked safety data.

In December 2007, the utility said it had known since 2003 that a fault running near the site was active, contradicting a survey previously submitted to the trade ministry.

Tokyo Electric posted its first loss in 28 years in the year ended March 2008 and had a 84.5 billion yen ($856 million) loss last year because of the cost of buying fossil fuel at peak prices to boost thermal generation.
The 8,212-megawatt Kashiwazaki Kariwa station accounts for more than 10 percent of the utility’s total capacity."

UPDATE 1 - TEPCO to Restart Quake-Hit Nuclear Plant Saturday - Forbes/Reuters - 08 May 09

"The restart could cut TEPCO's annual fuel purchases by more than 70 billion yen ($713 million) and cut carbon dioxide emissions by more than 5 million tonnes, according to company and Reuters calculations."
webfarmer: (Default)
Safe, inexpensive and reliable nuclear power at work. Hopefully it won't catch fire again anytime soon.

Tokyo Electric Quake-Hit Reactor Safe, Governor Says - Bloomberg - 07 May 09

"All seven reactors at the Kashiwazaki Kariwa plant were shut after the 6.8-magnitude earthquake in July 2007 shook it more than assumed possible in its design, triggering a fire and radiation leaks.

Asia’s biggest utility posted its second annual loss on April 30 because of costs related to the shutdown. Japan’s central government and two local mayors have already said the reactor is safe to restart, and assent by Niigata prefecture is the final approval needed. On April 10 Izumida postponed a decision on the reactor’s safety. The following day a fire broke out at the facility, the ninth since the shutdown."

"The latest fire stoked mistrust among local residents, who were concerned about the plant even before the earthquake. In 2002 Tokyo Electric revealed it had fabricated safety reports as far back as the 1980s, and the chairman and president resigned. In February 2007, five months before the earthquake, then- president Tsunehisa Katsumata said the company had found hundreds more incidents of faked safety data.

In December 2007, the utility said it had known since 2003 that a fault running near the site was active, contradicting a survey previously submitted to the trade ministry.

Tokyo Electric posted its first loss in 28 years in the year ended March 2008 and had a 84.5 billion yen ($856 million) loss last year because of the cost of buying fossil fuel at peak prices to boost thermal generation.
The 8,212-megawatt Kashiwazaki Kariwa station accounts for more than 10 percent of the utility’s total capacity."

UPDATE 1 - TEPCO to Restart Quake-Hit Nuclear Plant Saturday - Forbes/Reuters - 08 May 09

"The restart could cut TEPCO's annual fuel purchases by more than 70 billion yen ($713 million) and cut carbon dioxide emissions by more than 5 million tonnes, according to company and Reuters calculations."
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