Apr. 24th, 2009

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Looks like here's one EPR that will not be making a landing in the neighborhood anytime soon.

A Setback in the ‘Nuclear Renaissance’ - NY Times - 23 Apr 09

"A Missouri utility said Thursday that it was suspending its efforts to build a new nuclear reactor, making its proposed plant, Callaway 2, the first of the “nuclear renaissance” reactors to fall by the wayside."

"The utility, AmerenUE, planned to build a reactor near Fulton, Mo., but first it was seeking changes in the Missouri law governing how new power plants are financed. In a letter on Thursday it asked the sponsors of a new law now moving through the State Legislature to withdraw the measure, because in its current form it would not provide the 'financial and regulatory certainty' the company needed before construction could begin.

AmerenUE wanted to be allowed to charge its customers for financing costs before the plant was finished. A law that did not include that provision 'makes financing a new plant in the current economic environment impossible,'’ the company said."


AmerenUE Pulls Plug on Project - Columbia Daily Tribune - 23 Apr 09

"Within the span of just one legislative session, AmerenUE had tried to change a voter-approved provision of state law that had been on the books since 1976. It prohibits utilities from charging customers for a power plant’s construction until the plant is producing power. AmerenUE said that, without a change in the law, it could not build a power plant costing between $6 billion and $9 billion.

In the year before this legislative session, the AmerenUE Political Action Committee contributed $128,152 to state lawmakers’ political campaigns. The utility also paid thousands of dollars for a televised advertising blitz to garner support for what the company called its Clean and Renewable Energy Construction Act.

But the bill written by the utility’s lawyers ran into a storm of opposition from representatives of residential and industrial customers. Consumer activists said provisions would take away powers of the Public Service Commission to regulate utilities. They said rates would increase by 40 percent if the measure were approved."
webfarmer: (Default)
Looks like here's one EPR that will not be making a landing in the neighborhood anytime soon.

A Setback in the ‘Nuclear Renaissance’ - NY Times - 23 Apr 09

"A Missouri utility said Thursday that it was suspending its efforts to build a new nuclear reactor, making its proposed plant, Callaway 2, the first of the “nuclear renaissance” reactors to fall by the wayside."

"The utility, AmerenUE, planned to build a reactor near Fulton, Mo., but first it was seeking changes in the Missouri law governing how new power plants are financed. In a letter on Thursday it asked the sponsors of a new law now moving through the State Legislature to withdraw the measure, because in its current form it would not provide the 'financial and regulatory certainty' the company needed before construction could begin.

AmerenUE wanted to be allowed to charge its customers for financing costs before the plant was finished. A law that did not include that provision 'makes financing a new plant in the current economic environment impossible,'’ the company said."


AmerenUE Pulls Plug on Project - Columbia Daily Tribune - 23 Apr 09

"Within the span of just one legislative session, AmerenUE had tried to change a voter-approved provision of state law that had been on the books since 1976. It prohibits utilities from charging customers for a power plant’s construction until the plant is producing power. AmerenUE said that, without a change in the law, it could not build a power plant costing between $6 billion and $9 billion.

In the year before this legislative session, the AmerenUE Political Action Committee contributed $128,152 to state lawmakers’ political campaigns. The utility also paid thousands of dollars for a televised advertising blitz to garner support for what the company called its Clean and Renewable Energy Construction Act.

But the bill written by the utility’s lawyers ran into a storm of opposition from representatives of residential and industrial customers. Consumer activists said provisions would take away powers of the Public Service Commission to regulate utilities. They said rates would increase by 40 percent if the measure were approved."

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