Apr. 5th, 2009

webfarmer: (Default)
This time from the great state of Arizona. Looks like the PIRGs are using the same template for multiple areas. Sen. McCain will not be pleased. :)

Utilities Challenged to Justify Nuke Work - Arizona Republic - 04 Apri 09

"Utilities that want to build new nuclear reactors should have to prove they are a better investment than energy efficiency, a new report says. The Arizona Public Interest Research Group Education Fund this week released its 40-page report, titled 'The High Cost of Nuclear Power: Why America Should Choose a Clean Energy Future Over New Nuclear Power.'[PDF] According to the report, utilities can cut the amount of energy they need to supply customers by offering them incentives to install low-power appliances or insulate their homes better. "

"Incentives for energy-conservation cost utilities about 3 cents per kilowatt-hour of energy saved, the report said. Kilowatt-hours are the units of energy that customers are billed for, and utilities serving the Phoenix area charge about 9 cents per kilowatt-hour of energy used, depending on the rate plan. The report says that with the escalating costs of nuclear reactors, utilities would have to charge about 15 cents per kilowatt-hour for power from new reactors. "
webfarmer: (Default)
This time from the great state of Arizona. Looks like the PIRGs are using the same template for multiple areas. Sen. McCain will not be pleased. :)

Utilities Challenged to Justify Nuke Work - Arizona Republic - 04 Apri 09

"Utilities that want to build new nuclear reactors should have to prove they are a better investment than energy efficiency, a new report says. The Arizona Public Interest Research Group Education Fund this week released its 40-page report, titled 'The High Cost of Nuclear Power: Why America Should Choose a Clean Energy Future Over New Nuclear Power.'[PDF] According to the report, utilities can cut the amount of energy they need to supply customers by offering them incentives to install low-power appliances or insulate their homes better. "

"Incentives for energy-conservation cost utilities about 3 cents per kilowatt-hour of energy saved, the report said. Kilowatt-hours are the units of energy that customers are billed for, and utilities serving the Phoenix area charge about 9 cents per kilowatt-hour of energy used, depending on the rate plan. The report says that with the escalating costs of nuclear reactors, utilities would have to charge about 15 cents per kilowatt-hour for power from new reactors. "
webfarmer: (Default)
Thanks to markmc03 for this one. Looks promising at first glance.

Bacterium Eats Electricity, Farts Biogas - New Scientist - 05 Apr 09

"The new method relies on a bacterium discovered by Bruce Logan's team at Pennsylvania State University in University Park. When living on the cathode of an electrolytic cell, the organism can take in electrons and use their energy to convert carbon dioxide into methane. Logan's team discovered this behaviour in a mixed culture of bacteria, dominated by Methanobacterium palustre – the first to be observed directly manufacturing methane in this way. The behaviour had been previously suspected but not confirmed.

Tom Curtis at the Institute for Research on Environment and Sustainability at Newcastle University, UK, says that the use of bacteria, rather than conventional catalysts, is a plus. 'There are no noble metals involved, so it should be very cheap,' he says. Of the energy put into the system as electricity, 80% was eventually recovered when the methane was burned – a fairly high efficiency. 'You don't get all the energy back, but that's a problem with any form of energy storage,' says Curtis."
webfarmer: (Default)
Thanks to markmc03 for this one. Looks promising at first glance.

Bacterium Eats Electricity, Farts Biogas - New Scientist - 05 Apr 09

"The new method relies on a bacterium discovered by Bruce Logan's team at Pennsylvania State University in University Park. When living on the cathode of an electrolytic cell, the organism can take in electrons and use their energy to convert carbon dioxide into methane. Logan's team discovered this behaviour in a mixed culture of bacteria, dominated by Methanobacterium palustre – the first to be observed directly manufacturing methane in this way. The behaviour had been previously suspected but not confirmed.

Tom Curtis at the Institute for Research on Environment and Sustainability at Newcastle University, UK, says that the use of bacteria, rather than conventional catalysts, is a plus. 'There are no noble metals involved, so it should be very cheap,' he says. Of the energy put into the system as electricity, 80% was eventually recovered when the methane was burned – a fairly high efficiency. 'You don't get all the energy back, but that's a problem with any form of energy storage,' says Curtis."

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