Mar. 25th, 2009

webfarmer: (Default)
A nice Q&A piece on burying power lines. When I moved back to Nebraska from Hawaii some years back, we had this too early monster heavy wet snow storm that took all the power lines down in the downtown neighborhood I used to live in. The snow on the leaves overloaded the branches (you could hear them breaking with a sound like gun shots going off in the neighborhood) which then took out the power lines.

That was in my old neighborhood. In my new neighborhood, the wires were all underground. No major problems there.

Why Don't We Bury More Power Lines? - Renewable Energy World - 24 Mar 09

"Many people believe correctly that burying power lines solves lots of problems like the icing of powerlines and the avoidance of falling tree limbs on windy days that knock down lines. On the other hand, buried power lines make them more susceptable to damage from floods, earthquakes mudslides and can limit how quickly they can be repaired.

But the real limiting factor is that the cost of ditching and burying lines can be more than US $10 per foot. In fact, the state Public Service Commission staff found that burying Louisiana's utility lines to protect them from hurricane-force winds could cost $70 billion — far too much for the state's 2 million electricity customers to pay. Plans to go underground often hit a brick wall nationally, because burying existing overhead power lines costs about 10-15 times more than stringing them from poles."

"In Florida and North Carolina, statewide initiatives to bury power lines would have prompted a rate increase of 80 to 125 percent, according to a report by the Edison Electric Institute, the utility industry trade group. All of that said, the national trend in cities is to bury lines when the city's infrastructure is being upgraded."
webfarmer: (Default)
A nice Q&A piece on burying power lines. When I moved back to Nebraska from Hawaii some years back, we had this too early monster heavy wet snow storm that took all the power lines down in the downtown neighborhood I used to live in. The snow on the leaves overloaded the branches (you could hear them breaking with a sound like gun shots going off in the neighborhood) which then took out the power lines.

That was in my old neighborhood. In my new neighborhood, the wires were all underground. No major problems there.

Why Don't We Bury More Power Lines? - Renewable Energy World - 24 Mar 09

"Many people believe correctly that burying power lines solves lots of problems like the icing of powerlines and the avoidance of falling tree limbs on windy days that knock down lines. On the other hand, buried power lines make them more susceptable to damage from floods, earthquakes mudslides and can limit how quickly they can be repaired.

But the real limiting factor is that the cost of ditching and burying lines can be more than US $10 per foot. In fact, the state Public Service Commission staff found that burying Louisiana's utility lines to protect them from hurricane-force winds could cost $70 billion — far too much for the state's 2 million electricity customers to pay. Plans to go underground often hit a brick wall nationally, because burying existing overhead power lines costs about 10-15 times more than stringing them from poles."

"In Florida and North Carolina, statewide initiatives to bury power lines would have prompted a rate increase of 80 to 125 percent, according to a report by the Edison Electric Institute, the utility industry trade group. All of that said, the national trend in cities is to bury lines when the city's infrastructure is being upgraded."

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