Jan. 10th, 2009

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The new Nebraska state energy plan draft has a decidedly pro-nuclear tone to it. These three entries posted on noted energy expert Joseph Romm's Climate Progress blog along with a couple of other links from earlier reports on the economic costs of nuclear might be of interest in this regard.

"A new study puts the generation costs for power from new nuclear plants at from 25 to 30 cents per kilowatt-hour — triple current U.S. electricity rates!"

Exclusive analysis, Part 1: The staggering cost of new nuclear power
Warning to taxpayers, investors — Part 2: Nukes may become troubled assets, ruin credit ratings
Nuclear cost study 3: Responding to Heritage’s staggeringly confused ‘rebuttal’

This is in addition to earlier warnings of expensive new nuclear by the ratings organizations Moodys and Standard and Poor's (S&P).

In May of last year, Moodys came up with a $7,000 / kW installed figure and later in the year the Toronto Sun reported that S&P generated a range of estimates that went as high as $8,000 / kW installed.

For comparison, a large utility sized wind turbine might run you $2,600 / kW and a small 10 kW unit connected to the grid at a home might be more like $5,500 / kW. Each figure still gives headroom for storage compared to the nuclear option. You also don't have to wait 10 years for the first kWH to be produced (not to speak of other non-trivial concerns that nuclear also generates).

Also given the current pace of technological advances, the cost of renewables will likely be significantly lower than what they are today making the "new" nuclear plant even more of a white elephant in a competitive energy marketplace.

Sempra Solar Energy Project Makes Advances in Costs - LA Times - 05 Jan 09

"A veteran analyst has calculated that the facility can produce power at a cost of 7.5 cents a kilowatt-hour, less than the 9-cent benchmark for conventional electricity."

"What's clear is that the costs of solar power are dropping dramatically across the industry as the technology is more widely adopted and producers become more efficient. First Solar Chief Executive Michael J. Ahearn said his company had cut the cost of manufacturing its modules by 67% over the last four years.

'The photovoltaic industry,' Ahearn said, 'is much closer to generating affordable solar power than most people realize.'"
webfarmer: (Default)
The new Nebraska state energy plan draft has a decidedly pro-nuclear tone to it. These three entries posted on noted energy expert Joseph Romm's Climate Progress blog along with a couple of other links from earlier reports on the economic costs of nuclear might be of interest in this regard.

"A new study puts the generation costs for power from new nuclear plants at from 25 to 30 cents per kilowatt-hour — triple current U.S. electricity rates!"

Exclusive analysis, Part 1: The staggering cost of new nuclear power
Warning to taxpayers, investors — Part 2: Nukes may become troubled assets, ruin credit ratings
Nuclear cost study 3: Responding to Heritage’s staggeringly confused ‘rebuttal’

This is in addition to earlier warnings of expensive new nuclear by the ratings organizations Moodys and Standard and Poor's (S&P).

In May of last year, Moodys came up with a $7,000 / kW installed figure and later in the year the Toronto Sun reported that S&P generated a range of estimates that went as high as $8,000 / kW installed.

For comparison, a large utility sized wind turbine might run you $2,600 / kW and a small 10 kW unit connected to the grid at a home might be more like $5,500 / kW. Each figure still gives headroom for storage compared to the nuclear option. You also don't have to wait 10 years for the first kWH to be produced (not to speak of other non-trivial concerns that nuclear also generates).

Also given the current pace of technological advances, the cost of renewables will likely be significantly lower than what they are today making the "new" nuclear plant even more of a white elephant in a competitive energy marketplace.

Sempra Solar Energy Project Makes Advances in Costs - LA Times - 05 Jan 09

"A veteran analyst has calculated that the facility can produce power at a cost of 7.5 cents a kilowatt-hour, less than the 9-cent benchmark for conventional electricity."

"What's clear is that the costs of solar power are dropping dramatically across the industry as the technology is more widely adopted and producers become more efficient. First Solar Chief Executive Michael J. Ahearn said his company had cut the cost of manufacturing its modules by 67% over the last four years.

'The photovoltaic industry,' Ahearn said, 'is much closer to generating affordable solar power than most people realize.'"

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